Complete Solutions to the Physics GRE: PGRE9277

August 5, 2017 | Author: Taylor Faucett | Category: Wave Function, Chemical Bond, Heat Capacity, Electron, Valence (Chemistry)
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Complete Solutions to the Physics GRE

Exam #9277

Taylor Faucett

Senior Editor: Taylor Faucett Editor-in-Chief: Taylor Faucett Associate Editor: Taylor Faucett Editorial Assistant: Taylor Faucett Art Studio: Taylor Faucett Art Director: Taylor Faucett Cover Design: Taylor Faucett Cover Image: “Composition with red, yellow blue and black” and Feynman

BiBTeX: @Book{Faucett9677, author = {Taylor Faucett}, series = {Complete Solutions to the Physics GRE}, title = {Exam #9277}, pages = {36--38}, year = {2010}, edition = {first}, }

c 2010 Taylor Faucett

The “Complete Solutions to the Physics GRE” series has been produced strictly for educational and non-profit purposes. All information contained within this document may be copied and reproduced provided that these intentions are not violated.

Contents 1 Physics GRE Solutions 1.1 PGRE9277 #1 . . . 1.2 PGRE9277 #2 . . . 1.3 PGRE9277 #3 . . . 1.4 PGRE9277 #4 . . . 1.5 PGRE9277 #5 . . . 1.6 PGRE9277 #6 . . . 1.7 PGRE9277 #7 . . . 1.8 PGRE9277 #8 . . . 1.9 PGRE9277 #9 . . . 1.10 PGRE9277 #10 . . . 1.11 PGRE9277 #11 . . . 1.12 PGRE9277 #12 . . . 1.13 PGRE9277 #13 . . . 1.14 PGRE9277 #14 . . . 1.15 PGRE9277 #15 . . . 1.16 PGRE9277 #16 . . . 1.17 PGRE9277 #17 . . . 1.18 PGRE9277 #18 . . . 1.19 PGRE9277 #19 . . . 1.20 PGRE9277 #20 . . . 1.21 PGRE9277 #21 . . . 1.22 PGRE9277 #22 . . . 1.23 PGRE9277 #23 . . . 1.24 PGRE9277 #24 . . . 1.25 PGRE9277 #25 . . . 1.26 PGRE9277 #26 . . . 1.27 PGRE9277 #27 . . . 1.28 PGRE9277 #28 . . . 1.29 PGRE9277 #29 . . . 1.30 PGRE9277 #30 . . . 1.31 PGRE9277 #31 . . . 1.32 PGRE9277 #32 . . . 1.33 PGRE9277 #33 . . . 1.34 PGRE9277 #34 . . . 1.35 PGRE9277 #35 . . . 1.36 PGRE9277 #36 . . .

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3 3 4 5 6 7 9 11 12 13 15 17 19 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 36 37 38 40 41 42 43 44 45 46

CONTENTS

1.37 1.38 1.39 1.40 1.41 1.42 1.43 1.44 1.45 1.46 1.47 1.48 1.49 1.50 1.51 1.52 1.53 1.54 1.55 1.56 1.57 1.58 1.59 1.60 1.61 1.62 1.63 1.64 1.65 1.66 1.67 1.68 1.69 1.70 1.71 1.72 1.73 1.74 1.75 1.76 1.77 1.78 1.79 1.80 1.81 1.82 1.83 1.84

PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277 PGRE9277

CONTENTS

#37 . #38 . #39 . #40 . #41 . #42 . #43 . #44 . #45 . #46 . #47 . #48 . #49 . #50 . #51 . #52 . #53 . #54 . #55 . #56 . #57 . #58 . #59 . #60 . #61 . #62 . #63 . #64 . #65 . #66 . #67 . #68 . #69 . #70 . #71 . #72 . #73 . #74 . #75 . #76 . #77 . #78 . #79 . #80 . #81 . #82 . #83 . #84 .

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47 48 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 59 61 62 63 64 66 68 70 72 74 75 77 78 79 80 82 83 84 85 88 90 91 93 94 95 97 99 101 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 111 113 115

CONTENTS

1.85 PGRE9277 1.86 PGRE9277 1.87 PGRE9277 1.88 PGRE9277 1.89 PGRE9277 1.90 PGRE9277 1.91 PGRE9277 1.92 PGRE9277 1.93 PGRE9277 1.94 PGRE9277 1.95 PGRE9277 1.96 PGRE9277 1.97 PGRE9277 1.98 PGRE9277 1.99 PGRE9277 1.100PGRE9277

CONTENTS

#85 . #86 . #87 . #88 . #89 . #90 . #91 . #92 . #93 . #94 . #95 . #96 . #97 . #98 . #99 . #100

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116 118 119 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 131 132 133 134

List of Figures 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5

Mirror (image) charges induced as a result of an infinite grounding plate Right hand rule for a magnetic field passing through a loop of wire . . . Left hand rule for a current through a magnetic field . . . . . . . . . . . Energy level diagram of Sodium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Plots of the solution to the infinite square well . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2

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16 71 71 77 122

Chapter 1

Physics GRE Solutions 1.1

PGRE9277 #1

Recommended Solution The momentum operator from quantum mechanics is ¯ h Pˆ = ∇ψ i i(kx−ωt) If we substitute in the wave function ψ = e , ¯ ∂  i(kx−ωt)  h e i ∂x ¯hki i(kx−ωt) = e i = ¯hkψ

Pˆ =

Correct Answer (C) 3

(1.1)

(1.2) (1.3) (1.4)

1.2. PGRE9277 #2

1.2

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #2

Recommended Solution Bragg diffraction describes the phenomena by which specific angles of incident and wavelengths of x-rays will generate a peak in reflected radiation. From Bragg diffraction we get Bragg’s law, 2d sin(θ) = nλ

(1.5)

From Bragg’s law, it’s clear that the wavelength for any given n will be maximized when θ = 90◦ = π/2 making the LHS 2d. Correct Answer (D)

4

1.3. PGRE9277 #3

1.3

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #3

Recommended Solution From the Bohr Model, we get the approximation of any Hydrogen like atoms as Z 2 Re (1.6) n2 for the ratio between carbon and magnesium, the only component of our approximation that will change is Z, so take the ratio of the 2 values, En = −

EC EM g

= = =

ZC2 2 ZM g 62 122 1 4

Correct Answer (A)

5

(1.7) (1.8) (1.9)

1.4. PGRE9277 #4

1.4

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #4

Recommended Solution Recall that the force due to gravity between two objects of mass m1 and m2 is proportional to the inverse squared value of the radius, m1 m2 R2 thus, if we double the radius (i.e. R → 2R) then we get F =G

F (R) F (2R)

1/R2 1/(2R)2 4R2 = R2 = 4 =

Correct Answer (C)

6

(1.10)

(1.11) (1.12) (1.13)

1.5. PGRE9277 #5

1.5

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #5

Recommended Solution In this problem, the point mass is located inside of the earth, specifically half way between the earth center and its surface. We can’t just use the inverse square law in this form so utilize the part of the problem that tells us to assume the planet is homogenous. From this, we can calculate the mass of the earth, and the point mass, as being proportional to its density, ρ, by 4 M = πR3 ρ 3

(1.14)

so the gravitational force it wields is GM G F (R) = 2 = 2 R R



compare this to the case of of R/2, 7

4 3 4 πR ρ = πRρ 3 3 

(1.15)

1.5. PGRE9277 #5

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

G F (R/2) = (R/2)2



4 4 1 π(R/2)3 ρ = πR ρ 3 3 2 

(1.16)

finally, take the ratio of the two equations to get 4 πRρ F (R) = 43 1 = 2 F (R/2) 3 πR 2 ρ

Correct Answer (C)

8

(1.17)

1.6. PGRE9277 #6

1.6

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #6

Recommended Solution For starters, throw out option (E) as it can’t be true that the system is in balance for all conceivable values of M of the block. second, get rid of (A) because it doesn’t account for the coefficient of friction. If you aren’t convinced we need it, consider that when µ = 0, we should see our equation go to 0, which isn’t true of (A). Next, eliminate (B) because when we maximize the coefficient of friction at µ = 1, then no amount of mass should move the wedges and the equation should blow up. We can’t make any more reasonable simplifications so if you struggle with the mechanics, at least you can guess. However, to solve between (C) and (D), let’s consider the influence of the block on just one wedge. The block has a force downward which, because of the 45◦ angle between it and the block, generates a vertical force and horizontal force on the wedge (in fact it is the normal force of the block at its angle of incidence on the wedge). Since the angle is 45◦ , we can find the amount of force the block is putting out by FG FG−x = FG tan(45◦ )

tan(θ) = FG−x

FG−x = FG 9

(1.18) (1.19) (1.20)

1.6. PGRE9277 #6

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

which tells us that the horizontal force is equivalent to the vertical force of the block. Now, since half of the force will be used on each block, if we are only considering one block, the horizontal force generated by the block will be 1 FG−x = M g (1.21) 2 As the block applies the force, the frictional force of the wedge will try to resist it. From this, we know that the wedge will begin to move when the applied force over powers the frictional force, FG−x + f > 0

(1.22)

and since the frictional force is f = µFN , we find the normal force of the wedge by summing the vertical forces

FN

= −FG M = − m+ 2 

(1.23) 

(1.24)

where the mass on the wedge is the wedges mass plus half of the blocks mass (i.e. M/2). combine our equations and solve to get

FG−x + f > 0  1 M Mg − µ m + > 0 2 2 M − 2µm − µM > 0

(1.25)



M (1 − µ) > 2µm 2µm M > (1 − µ) Correct Answer (D)

10

(1.26) (1.27) (1.28) (1.29)

1.7. PGRE9277 #7

1.7

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #7

Recommended Solution For the given apparatus, there are 3 possible modes. The first one they give to us is a normal mode of 0 (i.e. no frequency). The next mode given represents the 2 masses swaying in the same direction. Finally, we need to consider the last mode which occurs when masses sway in opposite directions, in which case it doesn’t matter what the masses are and we can choose (A). Correct Answer (A)

11

1.8. PGRE9277 #8

1.8

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #8

Recommended Solution The description in this problem is a little bit ridiculous but once you figure out what is going on, the problem is relatively easy. Torque is positive or negative based on the right hand rule and from this, we know that we want the cone to rotate in a clockwise direction about the z-direction ˆ Any force in the kˆ isn’t going to get our cone spinning so when viewing the cone from above (+k). eliminate (A), (B) and (E). Next, looking at (C) and (D) it should be apparent that (C) will give us a negative torque (which is what we want) while (D) gives us a positive torque. Correct Answer (C)

12

1.9. PGRE9277 #9

1.9

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #9

Recommended Solution The intent behind coaxial cable shielding is to eliminate (at least in theory) the presence of an E&M field outside of the cable to reduce interference with other electronic equipment. This leads us to choice (A). Correct Answer (A)

Alternate Solution As our distance from the cable blows up to infinity (r → ∞) we would expect the magnetic field to go to 0, which eliminates (B), (D) and (E). Next, recall that the magnetic field of a single, infinitely long cable can be found from Amperes law ~ = µ0 i B (1.30) 2πR which is identical to (C). It is unreasonable to assume that adding a shielding element won’t alter this equation with some dependence on a & b, so we are left with (A). 13

1.9. PGRE9277 #9

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

Correct Answer (A)

14

1.10. PGRE9277 #10

1.10

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #10

Recommended Solution First, let’s recall the inverse square law for the 2 charges q1 and q2 1 q1 q2 rˆ (1.31) 4π0 r2 because of the infinite, grounded conducting plane at x = 0, we will get image charges of −q and −2q at x = −0.5 a and x = −1.5 a respectively. This tells us that we will get three charges pushing on charge q at x = 0.5 a. The first charge will be 2q at x = 1.5 a which will oppose q to the left. The other two charges, −q and −2q will attract q to the left as well. Sum all of the forces on q to get F =

q 2q −q −2q (−ˆ x) + 2 (ˆ x) + (ˆ x) 2 4π0 a a (2a)2   q −4q 2q q − 2− 2 4π0 2a2 2a 2a 2 1 7q 4π0 2 a2 

F

= = =



15

(1.32) (1.33) (1.34)

1.10. PGRE9277 #10

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

Figure 1.1: Mirror (image) charges induced as a result of an infinite grounding plate Correct Answer (E)

16

1.11. PGRE9277 #11

1.11

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #11

Recommended Solution Recall that the energy of the capacitor is 1 (1.35) U = CV 2 2 Next, use Kirchhoff’s second law which tells us that the sum of all voltages about a closed circuit is zero, to get VC + VR = 0 Q + IR = 0 C Q ˙ + QR C

(1.36) (1.37) (1.38)

where I = Q˙ because current is defined as a moving charge, Q. Rearrange the previous equation and integrate to get Q C Z dt − RC t − RC

dQ R dt Z dQ = Q   Q = ln Q0 = −

17

(1.39) (1.40) (1.41)

1.11. PGRE9277 #11

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

Q = Q0 e−t/RC

(1.42)

From this, we also conclude that I = I0 e−t/RC

(1.43)

−t/RC

(1.44)

V

= V0 e

From our initial energy equation, U = 12 CV 2 , we get a voltage equation s

V =

2U C

(1.45)

2U0 −t/RC e C

(1.46)

and so our voltage equation is s

s

2U C

=

= U0 e−2t/RC

U

(1.47)

since we are concerned with the point at which half of the energy has dissipated, substitute in U = U0 /2 U0 = U0 e−2t/RC 2 1 = 2e−2t/RC −2t/RC

e

2t − RC

(1.48) (1.49)

= 2

(1.50)

= ln(2)

(1.51)

t =

RCln(2) 2

Correct Answer (E)

18

(1.52)

1.12. PGRE9277 #12

1.12

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #12

Recommended Solution Recall LaPlace’s equation ∇2 V = 0

(1.53)

since the problem only tells us to concern ourselves with the φ component, we can integrate LaPlace’s equation to get d2 V (φ) dφ2

= 0

19

(1.54)

1.12. PGRE9277 #12

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

dV (φ) = A dφ V (φ) = Aφ + B

(1.55) (1.56)

since we have the initial condition V (0) = 0, we know that B = 0 V (φ) = Aφ

(1.57)

V0 = Aa V0 A = a

(1.58)

since V (a) = V0 ,

(1.59)

compare this to the equations general form, V = Aφ, to get V0 a

=

V

=

V φ Vφ a

Correct Answer (B)

20

(1.60) (1.61)

1.13. PGRE9277 #13

1.13

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #13

Recommended Solution ~ = 0 as the If you are like me, you probably learned and memorized Maxwell’s equation, ∇ · B ”There ain’t no magnetic monopoles” law. For this reason, you know you can immediately get IV as one of the laws that becomes INCORRECT. Next, consider that if we don’t require the magnetic field to curl back on itself in order to force the divergence of the magnetic field to zero, then it is possible to get the electric field to not curl which tells us II could also be INCORRECT and we choose (D). Correct Answer (D)

21

1.14. PGRE9277 #14

1.14

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #14

Recommended Solution From Stefan-Boltzmann’s Law, we get the power radiation of a black body as j ∗ = uT 4

(1.62)

which tells us that doubling the temperature of the black body will alter the power proportional to the fourth power j ∗ = u(2T )4

(1.63)

4

(1.64)

= 16(uT ) since power is energy over time and heat energy is Q = mc∆T

(1.65)

we get that a unit increase in energy will increase temperature by 0.5◦ C and, therefore, 16 units of energy increase will get a change in temperature of 8◦ C. Correct Answer (C)

22

1.15. PGRE9277 #15

1.15

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #15

Recommended Solution Heat capacity of a molecule is determined by the number of degrees of freedom of the molecule. For example, in a monatomic gas, the heat capacity is 3 CV = R (1.66) 2 where the 3 comes from our 3 degrees of translational freedom (ˆ x, yˆ, zˆ). For a springy, diatomic molecule, we have to then include additional degrees of freedom for its rotation and its vibration 3 7 CV = R + Rrot + Rvib = R 2 2 Correct Answer (C)

23

(1.67)

1.16. PGRE9277 #16

1.16

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #16

Recommended Solution The maximum efficiency of a Carnot engine (a theoretically, perfectly efficient heat engine) is η=

W TC =1− QH TH

(1.68)

where η is the maximum efficiency, W is the work done by the system, QH is the heat input, TC is the absolute temperature of the cold reservoir and TH is the absolute temperature of the hot reservoir. Convert temperatures to units of Kelvin to get TC TH 800 K = 1− 1000 K = 1 − 0.8

(1.71)

= 0.2

(1.72)

η = 1−

(1.69) (1.70)

equate η to the work over heat equation with a heat of QH = 2000 J to get W QH W

= 0.2

(1.73)

= (0.2)(2000 J)

(1.74)

= 400 J

(1.75)

Correct Answer (A)

24

1.17. PGRE9277 #17

1.17

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #17

Recommended Solution The problem tells us that the frequency in the x-direction is twice that of the y-direction, so we know that the oscilloscope will be plotting f (t) = sin(ωt) + sin(2ωt)

(1.76)

Using your copy of Mathematica provided in the front of your test booklet, plot the function to get the figure below

However, in the case that your test booklet doesn’t have Mathematica, we can eliminate options (E) and (D) because the superposition of two sine waves shouldn’t give us either of the two curves. Next, eliminate (B) and (C) because both represent just a function of sin(ωt) or cos(ωt), not a superposition of trig functions. Correct Answer (A)

25

1.18. PGRE9277 #18

1.18

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #18

Recommended Solution With coaxial cables, impedance matching is necessary because differences in characteristic impedance can result in signal reflection, particularly in the case of a damaged/kinked line or an incorrectly/damaged termination to the cable. Correct Answer (C)

26

1.19. PGRE9277 #19

1.19

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #19

Recommended Solution Use Newton’s second law and our gravitational force law,

F F

= ma mM = G 2 r

(1.77) (1.78)

combine the two and cancel m to get mM r2 M a = G 2 r gr2 M = G

ma = G

(1.79) (1.80) (1.81)

to simplify the mental math, assume that G = 6×10−11 m3 /kg·s2 , g = 10 m/s2 and r = 6×106 m

M

=

gr2 G  2 10 m/s2 6 × 106 m

=

(6 × 10−11 m3 /kg · s2 ) 6 × 1013 = 6 × 10−11 = 1 × 1024 kg

which is closest to (A). Correct Answer (A)

27

(1.82) (1.83) (1.84) (1.85)

1.20. PGRE9277 #20

1.20

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #20

Recommended Solution based on the given diagram, we know it can’t be true that d < ω so (C) and (E) can be eliminated. Next, recall that the equation for constructive interference in double slit diffraction is d sin(θ) = m1 λ

(1.86)

additionally, we know that we will get a ”missing” interference maximum when the constructive double slit equation coincides with the single slit diffraction, so we use ωsin(θ) = m2 λ

(1.87)

get both equations equal to sin(θ) and set them equal to one another and solve for d, ω m2

=

d =

d m1 m1 ω m2

comparing this to (A) and (B), we aren’t going to get an irrational number (i.e. with some fraction of integers so we can confidently choose (D). Correct Answer (D)

28

(1.88) (1.89) √

2 or



3)

1.21. PGRE9277 #21

1.21

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #21

Recommended Solution In thin film optics, and most optics in general, I is unequivocally silly so eliminate all choices which include it, i.e. (A) and (D). Next, consider III and IV and recognize that both are correct. More specifically, it is true that we will get a phase change as the light transitions from a lower index of refraction to a higher one (as it enters the bubble) and no phase change as it transitions from a higher index of refraction to a lower one (as it exits the bubble). Eliminate any options that don’t include both of these choices, specifically (C). Finally, when considering option II, recall that equations for thin film optics Constructive Interference 2t = λ/2 Destructive Interference 2t = λ which tells us that in either case, the thickness of the bubble is generally less than the wavelength (i.e. half or a quarter) Correct Answer (B)

29

1.22. PGRE9277 #22

1.22

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #22

Recommended Solution The quick and easy solution, dare I say the ”Plug-n-chug” method, is to use the magnification equation for a convex lens M=

f0bj feye

(1.90)

We are given the objective focal length, fobj = 1.0 meter and the magnification M = 10 so we solve for feye , fobj M 1.0 m = 10 = 0.1 m

feye =

(1.91) (1.92) (1.93)

Lastly, we get the total distance from the sum of the two focal lengths,

d = fobj + feye

(1.94)

= 1.0 m + 0.1 m

(1.95)

= 1.1 m

(1.96)

Correct Answer (D)

30

1.23. PGRE9277 #23

1.23

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #23

Recommended Solution The average speed of a conduction electron is described by the Fermi velocity, with equation s

vf =

2Ef m

(1.97)

where the Fermi energy, Ef , is related to the Fermi temperature, Tf , by Ef = kTf

(1.98)

where k is Boltzmann’s constant. Plug everything into our equation to get s

vf

= s

=

2Ef m

(1.99)

2kTf m

(1.100)

simplify the values for the electron mass, fermi temperature and Boltzmann’s constant s

vf

= s

= s



2kTf m

(1.101)

2(1 × 10−23 J/K)(80, 000 K) 10 × 10−31 kg

(1.102)

10 × 1031 16 × 1019 m2 /s2

(1.103)

≈ 1 × 106 m/s Correct Answer (E)

31

(1.104)

1.24. PGRE9277 #24

1.24

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #24

Recommended Solution Argon, like the other noble gases, has a full valence shell. Ionic bonding is bonding between a metal and a non-metal and also requires that one atom lack electrons from its valence shell and the other have an excess charge (think along the lines of the salt molecule with N a+ + Cl− ) so we can eliminate (A). Covalent bonding, on the other hand, involves the sharing of electrons to fill out the valence shell when an atom is lacking electrons in its valence shell, but again Argon isn’t missing any electrons so we eliminate (B) and then eliminate (C). Finally, since Argon isn’t a metal, eliminate (D). As it turns out, argon bonds to other argon atoms by induced dipoles via the Van der Waals force. Correct Answer (E)

32

1.25. PGRE9277 #25

1.25

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #25

Recommended Solution The ability of a particle to pass through solid material is increased as the size of the particle decreases and as the speed of the particle increases. From this, we would expect larger particles like protons and neutrons to struggle to pass ”deep underground” and we can eliminate (A), (B) and (C). Between (D) and (E), all of the listed particles are sufficiently fast and small but neutrinos have no charge, unlike positrons, electrons and muons so we should expect them to not be caught or repelled away from electrons in the matter they are trying to pass through and we should expect them to be in the final answer. Correct Answer (D)

33

1.26. PGRE9277 #26

1.26

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #26

Recommended Solution At time t = 0, the number of counts is at 103.5 counts. We can approximate this value by √ √ 103.5 = 107/2 = (107 )1/2 = 100 · 100 · 100 · 10 = 10 · 10 · 10 · 10 √ if we approximate 10 ≈ 3 then we get 103.5 = 3000

(1.105)

(1.106)

This means that half the counts will be 1500 and so at about 17 min, where the counts is 103 = 1000 counts, we’ve passed our half way point and we can eliminate (D) and (E). For (A), (B) and (C), the counts are approximately (A) 103.4 ≈ 2500 counts (B) 103.2 ≈ 1600 counts (C) 103.1 ≈ 1300 counts 34

1.26. PGRE9277 #26

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

so we choose (B) which is the closest Correct Answer (B)

35

1.27. PGRE9277 #27

1.27

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #27

Recommended Solution The width of the wave-function is determined by the relative size of ∆p and ∆x in the Heisenberg uncertainty principle ∆x ∆p ≥

¯ h 2

(1.107)

Recalling our momentum equation p=h ¯k

(1.108)

where ¯h is a constant, we get ∆p = ¯h∆k. Combine this with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle and solve for ∆k

∆x ∆p ≥ (∆x) (¯h∆k) ≥ ∆k ≥

¯ h 2 ¯h 2 1 2(∆x)

which gives us the inverse relationship between ∆k and ∆x like in (B). Correct Answer (B)

36

(1.109) (1.110) (1.111)

1.28. PGRE9277 #28

1.28

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #28

Recommended Solution In quantum mechanics, the probability of finding the system in a certain state is given by the integral over the squared wave function, or in our case Ylm (θ, φ). The problem asks us about the state with azimuthal orbital quantum number, m=3, so we take the squared values of the form Yl3 (θ, φ). Since our wave function is already normalized, we just need to square the values of the first two terms of ψ ψm=3 = 52 + 12 = 26

(1.112)

ψtotal = 52 + 12 + 22 = 30

(1.113)

therefore, the probability of ψm=3 out of the total ψtotal is ψm=3 /ψtotal = 26/30

(1.114)

= 13/15

(1.115)

Correct Answer (E)

37

1.29. PGRE9277 #29

1.29

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #29

Recommended Solution Questions regarding the infinite square well (particle in a box) and its related plot show up on nearly every test. For this reason, and simply because it is something you oughta know, you should 38

1.29. PGRE9277 #29

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

memorize some of the fundamental aspects of the infinite square well graph. First, the solution to the infinite square well is sinusoidal, which allows us to eliminate (A), (C) and (D). Next, when the function impinges on the infinite barrier at x1 and x2 , the amplitude continually decreases toward 0 and stops oscillating, which then allows us to eliminate (E). Correct Answer (B)

39

1.30. PGRE9277 #30

1.30

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #30

Recommended Solution Considering how often the ground state energy of positronium comes up in the GRE, and because it’s trivial to memorize, recall that its value is half that of hydrogen’s ground state E0,hyd 13.6 eV = = 6.8 eV (1.116) 2 2 Keep in mind that this is for the ground state but we need the binding energy in state n = 2. Using the Bohr equation, we see that the energy is inversely proportional to the squared value of the fundamental quantum number, n E0,pos =

En =

Z 2 E0,pos n2

(1.117)

E0 8

(1.118)

since Z = 1, the final answer is E2 =

Correct Answer (E)

40

1.31. PGRE9277 #31

1.31

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #31

Recommended Solution Recall our generic form for the Russel-Saunders term symbol 2s+1

LJ

(1.119)

the problem specifies that the helium atom has term symbol 3

S

(1.120)

so we know that 2s + 1 = 3, J = 1 and L = S. Solve for s to get s = 1 and then recalling the angular momentum quantum number can be found by j =l+s

(1.121)

since S = L, and S corresponds to 0, (i.e. (S, P, D, F, . . .) → (0, 1, 2, 3, . . .)), we finally get j =0+1=1 Correct Answer (B)

41

(1.122)

1.32. PGRE9277 #32

1.32

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #32

Recommended Solution First, recall that the equivalent resistance of resistors in parallel can be found by 1 1 1 = + + ··· Req R1 R2

(1.123)

From Equation , we can see that the equivalent resistance of the R3 -R4 system and R2 -R5 system will have less resistance than R1 on its own. Additionally, we know that power is related to voltage and current by V2 (1.124) R Which tells us that in addition to R1 having the highest resistance, it will also be the case that the highest current will interact with this resistor and so we should expect R1 to have the biggest amount of current to dissipate. P = I2 · R =

Correct Answer (A)

42

1.33. PGRE9277 #33

1.33

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #33

Recommended Solution Using the rules for resistors and in parallel, find the equivalent resistance of all resistors in the circuit as Req = 75 Ω. This tells us that the current of the entire circuit should be V 3.0 V = (1.125) R 75 Ω Next, finding the equivalent resistance of resistors R3 , R4 and R5 , you’ll find that you have the same resistance in the RHS of the circuit as you do in the LHS (i.e .just resistor R2 ). This tells us that half the current (3/150 A) will go through resistor R2 and the other half will pass through R3,4,5 . Finally, find your equivalent resistance between R3 and R4 to get 2o Ω and then solve for the voltage I=



V = IR =

3 A (20 Ω) = 0.4 V 150 

Correct Answer (A)

43

(1.126)

1.34. PGRE9277 #34

1.34

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #34

Recommended Solution Because we are talking about electromagnetic waves in a waveguide, we can throw out all conditions which don’t give the results as being orthogonal for the electric and magnetic fields separately, i.e. (A) and (C). Then, we can eliminate (B) and choose (C) because the electric field doesn’t propagate in the same direction as the direction of current so the transverse electric field, Et , should be 0. Correct Answer (D)

44

1.35. PGRE9277 #35

1.35

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #35

Recommended Solution An optical diffraction grating works in effectively the same way that a double slit, triple slit, etc interference except with more slits. Based on this similarity, we should try to use our generic equation for double slit diffraction

d sin(θ) = mλ

(1.127) 

θ = arcsin

mλ d



(1.128)

where d is the distance between slits, θ is the angle of incidence, λ is the wavelength and m = 0, 1, 2, . . .. The wavelength is given as 5200 angstroms and we can find the distance between slits by assuming that the 2000 slits are evenly spaced across each centimeter of the diffraction grating. Plug this all into Equation 1.128 to get mλ d   (1)(5200angstroms) = arcsin (0.0005 cm) = arcsin(0.1) 



θ = arcsin



≈ 6

(1.129) (1.130) (1.131) (1.132)

Correct Answer (B)

45

1.36. PGRE9277 #36

1.36

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #36

Recommended Solution The problem tells us, quite explicitly might I add, that the surface which the E&M wave interacts with is a perfect conductor. This tells us that the net electric field must go to 0 as a result of the interaction. Since the electric field impinges on the surface with some value E0 , we know that the value afterwards must be equal and opposite, E1 = −E0

(1.133)

or, in words, its direction must reverse while maintaining the same magnitude. The magnetic field, however, won’t change direction because of the conductor so (C) becomes the obvious choice. Correct Answer (C)

46

1.37. PGRE9277 #37

1.37

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #37

Recommended Solution If you get this problem wrong, you probably should give up any aspirations you’ve ever held which involve you being a physicist. The problem tells us that the π 0 meson decays into 2 photons which head off in opposite directions. Arguably, the most fundamental and important aspect of relativity is that photons travel at the speed of light, 1 C, in all reference frames. From this, we know the only solutions can be (A) or (D). Since the problem tells us that the photon, γ2 , proceeds in the ”backwards” direction, the sign should be negative and we choose (A). Correct Answer (A)

47

1.38. PGRE9277 #38

1.38

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #38

Recommended Solution Before starting, let’s take a look at the general time dilation equation ∆t0 = γ∆t = p

∆t 1 − v 2 /c2

(1.134)

from this, we can see that ETS has, quite rudely, written things in terms of inverse Lorentz factors. At this point, I highly recommend that you quietly curse ETS under your breath and then re-write the equations in a more standard form, (A) ∆t1 = γ12 ∆t2 (B) ∆t3 = γ13 ∆t1 (C) ∆t3 = γ23 ∆t2 (D) ∆t2 = γ23 ∆t3 (E) ∆t2 = γ23 ∆t1 Right off the bat, eliminate (E) because it incorporates a Lorentz factor with frame 3 in it when the time for frame 3 isn’t even represented. Next, we know from the time dilation effect that the time of a moving frame in relation to a stationary frame will appear to be longer in the stationary frame. If we let the stationary frame be S1 , then we see that (A) incorrectly concludes that time in the stationary frame would be longer in the stationary frame than the moving frame. (C) and (D) don’t involve the stationary frame at all and we aren’t given enough information to conclude 48

1.38. PGRE9277 #38

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

anything about the relation between the two inertial frames, so those are both likely to be wrong. Only (B) correctly predicts the stationary vs inertial relationship Correct Answer (B)

49

1.39. PGRE9277 #39

1.39

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #39

Recommended Solution Recall that the sine function is an odd function, just like the plot given in the problem, while the cosine function is an even function. Based on this, we should eliminate all solutions which utilize cosine functions, i.e. (C), (D), and (E). I should point out that there is always a possibility that the cosine function could be shifted to produce and sine-esque plot, however in our case none of the solutions feature the necessary shift. Next, to choose between (A) and (B), plug in t = π/ω which should give us an amplitude of V (t) = −1. in (A), we get

V (t) = =

  ∞ 4X 1 nπω sin π 1 n ω

(1.135)

∞ 4X 1 sin (nπ) π 1 n

(1.136)

From Equation 1.136, it should be clear that V (π/ω) will be 0 for all values of n, so our solution must be (B). Correct Answer (B) 50

1.40. PGRE9277 #40

1.40

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #40

Recommended Solution The acceleration at any point on the cylinder will be equal to the sum of all its accelerations. Since the problem explicitly specifies that the cylinder doesn’t slide, we know that there are no lateral forces to contribute. The only acceleration we have is the centripetal acceleration from its rotation which will be pointing toward the center of the cylinder. When the point under consideration is touching the surface of the plane, the acceleration must point up to point towards the cylinder center. Correct Answer (C)

51

1.41. PGRE9277 #41

1.41

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #41

Recommended Solution The kinetic energy of a rotating object is related to angular frequency, ω, and moment of inertia, I, by 1 EK = Iω 2 2

(1.137)

The moment of inertia is given as I = 4 kg·m2 and we are told that the initial angular frequency of 80 rad changes down to 40 rad. Using Equation 1.137 and accounting for the change in ω, we calculate the kinetic energy as

EK

 1  2 I ωf − ωi2 2   1 = 4 kg · m2 (80 rad/s)2 − (40 rad/s)2 2  1 = 4 kg · m2 (4800 rad/s) 2 = 9600 J

=

Correct Answer (D)

52

(1.138) (1.139) (1.140) (1.141)

1.42. PGRE9277 #42

1.42

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #42

Recommended Solution Recall our equation for torque τ = Iα

(1.142)

where α is the angular acceleration. We are given the change in angular velocity as ω = 40 rad/sec. Since the rate of change of angular velocity is given, we can find the average angular acceleration as ∆ω 40 rad/s = = 4 rad/s2 ∆t 10 s Plug our angular acceleration value from Equation 1.143 into Equation 1.142 to get α=

τ

= Iα =



(1.143)

(1.144)

4 kg · m2



16 rad/s2

= 16 N · m Correct Answer (D)

53



(1.145) (1.146)

1.43. PGRE9277 #43

1.43

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #43

Recommended Solution This problem is one of those infuriating exam questions that you either know, or you don’t. In this instance, you can only be sure you’ve got the right answer if you recall that Noether’s theorem tells us that pn is a constant under the condition pn =

∂L ∂qn

(1.147)

Even if you don’t know this, we can try to eliminate some of the options based on some common sense (A) An ignorable coordinate is a coordinate that doesn’t show up in the Lagrangian which is not the case (B) I can’t think of a compelling reason to eliminate this one (C) There is no reason to assume that differentiating the Lagrangian with respect to qn will be undefined except when ∂qn = 0 which would be a poor assumption (D) There is no mention made of a time dependence so it is unlikely that

∂L ∂qn

=

d dt



∂L ∂qn



.

(E) Keep in mind that the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian are both measures of Energy and it is not likely that you can differentiate only one but have them each keep the same units. Correct Answer (B)

54

1.44. PGRE9277 #44

1.44

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #44

Recommended Solution Recall that the Langrangian is the difference between the kinetic and gravitational potential energy, L=T −V

(1.148)

We can first eliminate (E) because the potential term most oppose the kinetic term and we need at least one minus sign. Next, we know the solution must have some potential energy term mgy so that all of the energy is kinetic at bottom of the parabola, so we eliminate (C) and (D). Finally, we know that the kinetic energy pieces should be adding together, not fighting one another, so we choose (A). Correct Answer (A)

55

1.45. PGRE9277 #45

1.45

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #45

Recommended Solution Before the ball is dropped, the net energy of the system is all potential equal to mgh. Once the ball is released, the potential is converted to kinetic until the ball hits the ground and all mgh of the energy is now kinetic equal to 1/2mv02 . The problem tells us that the velocity after collision is only 4/5 of its initial velocity, v0 , so the kinetic energy on its way back up is 1 4 2 m v 2 5 0   1 16 2 m v 2 25 0 

Tf

= =



(1.149) (1.150)

If we compare this to the original kinetic energy, it is clear that the final kinetic energy and, therefore, potential energy is 16/25 = 0.64 times as big as its initial energy. Correct Answer (D)

56

1.46. PGRE9277 #46

1.46

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #46

Recommended Solution The critical isotherm refers to a curve that has the property that the derivative of the pressure with respect to the volume is 0

57

1.46. PGRE9277 #46

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∂P =0 (1.151) ∂V Of the curves shown, only curve 2 has a point where taking the tangent to the curve results in a horizontal line (i.e. the derivative of the curve is 0). This occurs at precisely the point where the vertical and horizontal dashed lines cross. Correct Answer (B)

Alternate Solution Without knowing anything about isotherms, we can eliminate some options through a bit of reasoning. First, eliminate curves 3, 4 and 5 because they are all effectively the same, especially when discussing everything in qualitative terms. Next, you can eliminate curve 1 because, unlike curve 2, it is the same as all other similar curves above the horizontal dashed line and we would expect the solution to be unique. Correct Answer (B)

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PGRE9277 #47

Recommended Solution This problem asks us which region will have vapor and liquid in equilibrium which tells us that we expect to have both states present in the region. The quickest way to determine the answer is to consider each region in its limit

59

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(A) In region A, the volume extends to extremely small sizes and this would cause vapor to get compressed to liquid. This likely won’t support vapor and liquid phases at the same time. (B) Region B represents a middle ground of pressure and volume so there are no glaring limit issues. (C) In region C, the volume can blow up to infinity which would likely force everything to a vapor phase. (D) Region D allows the volume and the pressure to blow up to infinity, meaning there will absolutely be states which either force everything to vapor or everything to liquid. (E) Region E will allow the pressure to blow up to infinity which will force any vapor present into liquid. Only (B) lacks a limiting value that could potentially ruin our equilibrium. Correct Answer (B)

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #48

Recommended Solution At some point in your undergraduate career, you were probably forced to calculate some standard deviations by hand. If you did, then you likely used this equation v uN uX ¯)2 σ = t pi (xi − x

(1.152)

i=1

From Equation 1.152, we know to look for a square root and we can then eliminate (A), (D) and (E) based on this condition. Next, we should expect to see σ 2 values rather than simply σ so we eliminate (B) and choose (C). Correct Answer (C)

61

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #49

Recommended Solution Considering the amount of variation between the possible solutions, let’s do an approximation. Muons move very quickly and the problem tells us that the motion is relativistic, let’s approximate the speed of a muon going nearly the speed of light as just the speed of light vµ = 3.0 × 108 m/s

(1.153)

Since the scintillators are 3.0 meters apart, we can find the time scale as

∆t =

∆x vµ

(1.154)

3.0 m 3.0 × 108 m/s = 1 × 10−8 s

(1.156)

= 10 nanoseconds

(1.157)

=

so we will want to choose the nanosecond range, i.e. solution (B). Correct Answer (B)

62

(1.155)

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #50

Recommended Solution First of all, eliminate (E) because we would never be so lucky that we could expand a wave function into basis states under any and all circumstances. Next, eliminate (C) and (D) because A and B as well as α and β are qualitatively identical to one another so if (C) was true, (D) should also be true and we can’t choose both. Finally, eliminate (A) because whether or not the two eigenvalues are non-degenerate should have nothing to do with the basis functions of the wave function. Correct Answer (B)

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PGRE9277 #51

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Recommended Solution Starting with classical momentum, P = mx, ˙ recall that the analog for the expectation value of momentum is dhxi dt in the infinite square well, the expectation value for position is hpi = m

(1.158)

a (1.159) 2 since hxi is nothing but constants, if we take the derivative of it then it goes to 0 and so does hpi. hxi =

Correct Answer (B)

Alternate Solution More rigorously, we can use the general equation for expectation value hpi =

Z ∞

¯h ψ ∗ ψ dx i −∞

(1.160)

we are given the wave function so if we plug everything in, we get

hpi = =

Z ∞

¯h ψ ∗ ψdx i −∞     Z nπx nπx 2nπ¯h ∞ sin cos a2 i −∞ a a

(1.161) (1.162)

and since cosine and sine are orthogonal with respect to each other, integrating over all of x will result in each one canceling out the other and the total area is 0. Correct Answer (B)

65

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #52

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Recommended Solution The condition for orthonormality, hn|mi = δnm

(1.163)

is a function of the Kronecker delta type, i.e.

δnn = 1

(1.164)

δnm = 0

(1.165)

This is precisely the description in the problem so we choose the orthonormality condition. Correct Answer (B)

67

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #53

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Recommended Solution The energy of the infinite square well isn’t constant so we can immediately eliminate (C) and (E). Next, we can eliminate (A) because, in theory, there shouldn’t be an upper bound to the energy and (A) suggests that there is such a maximum energy. Lastly, you can quickly check the coefficients for (B) and (D) by recalling the energy equation derived form the Schrodinger equation, E=

p2 +V 2m

(1.166)

since V = 0 inside the potential, we get E = p2 /2m which tells us the coefficient should be 1/2 rather than 1/8 and so we can choose (B). Correct Answer (B)

69

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #54

Recommended Solution This problem is a left/right hand rule paradise (or nightmare depending on your familiarity with the rules). First of all, start by applying the right hand rule to the vertical wire with your thumb in the up direction. This tells us that the magnetic field is pointing into the plane on the side of the loop of wire. Now, apply the right hand rule of a magnetic field into the plane and into the loop such that your thumb is pointing into the plane and your hands are looping clockwise (Figure 1.2), allowing us to eliminate (A), (B) and (C). Lastly, use the left hand rule (Figure 1.3) with your thumb in the direction of the current, pointer finger into the plane and middle finger in the direction of the resulting force to find that the left side of the loop goes to the left and the right side of the loop goes right, leaving us with (E). Correct Answer (B) 70

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B

I

I B

Figure 1.2: Right hand rule for a magnetic field passing through a loop of wire

Figure 1.3: Left hand rule for a current through a magnetic field

71

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #55

Recommended Solution The quickest way to solve this problem is to consider the limits of the lengths a and b. If either of these go to 0 then the flux goes to 0 and so too does the force. For this reason, we can eliminate any solution that doesn’t have some dependence on both a and b, i.e. (A) and (B). Next, note that (C) and (E) blows up to infinity when a → 0 so eliminate both of these.

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Correct Answer (D)

73

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #56

Recommended Solution The general equation for energy of a quantum harmonic oscillator in state n is 

E=

1 + n hν 2 

(1.167)

In its ground state, n = 0 so the solution should be 

E = =

1 + 0 hν 2 

1 hν 2

Correct Answer (D)

74

(1.168) (1.169)

1.57. PGRE9277 #57

1.57

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #57

75

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

Recommended Solution Recall Faraday’s law which states that a current will be induced in a conductor due to a change in magnetic flux dφB |ε| = dt

(1.170)

from the description, we know that the half circle is rotating ”uniformly” so the induced current should be constant and we can eliminate (C), (D) and (E). As the half circle begins to enter the rectangle, it will have a constantly increasing induced current and once it begins to exit the rectangle, it should have a constantly decreasing induced current. Option (A) gives us this feature but (B) suggest a constantly increasing increase in induced current, which is not what we want. Correct Answer (A)

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #58

Recommended Solution In ground state, the number of electrons on the atom should be the same as Z = 11. The quickest way to figure out the number of electrons proposed in each of the 5 options is to sum up all of the superscripts in each configuration. Doing so will eliminate option (E). Next, we can eliminate (A) because we should completely fill 2p to 2p6 before moving to the next energy level. Next, eliminate (B) because the s level can’t have 3 electrons in it. Finally, recall your energy level diagrams (Figure 1.4) to see that we should progress to 3s after 2p as opposed to going from 2p to 3p

Figure 1.4: Energy level diagram of Sodium Correct Answer (C)

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #59

Recommended Solution In its ground state, the helium atom has 2 electrons in the first shell which, by the Pauli Exclusion Principle, has one spin up and one spin down. The spin multiplicity, which is 2S + 1, is what determines whether an atom is a singlet, doublet, triplet, etc. Singlet 2(0) + 1 = 1 Double 2(1/2) + 1 = 2 Triplet 2(1) + 1 = 3 In the case of helium, since we have two electrons with opposite directions of spin, they cancel to give us S = 0 which is a singlet Correct Answer (A)

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #60

Recommended Solution If you recall the equation for cyclotron resonance frequency, this problem is a quick plug-n-chug problem eB (1.171) m from the problem description, we are given values for B and m and we can get the elementary charge value e from the front of the test booklet. Plug these values into Equation 1.171 and solve ωc =

1.6 × 10−19 coulombs (1 tesla) = (0.1) (9 × 10−31 kg) 12 ≈ 2 × 10 rad/s 

ωc

Correct Answer (D)

79

(1.172) (1.173)

1.61. PGRE9277 #61

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #61

Recommended Solution Start by recalling the frequency equation for a pendulum, r

ω=

mgrcom I

(1.174)

where the moment of inertia will always be that of a point mass, I = mr2 . for the first pendulum, all of the mass is located at the bottom of the pendulum which makes our center of mass at a distance r, making our frequency equation r

r

2mgr g ωI = = (1.175) 2 2mr r for the second pendulum, however, the masses are separated at a distance of r/2 and r which forces the center of mass to be 3/4 r, so the frequency equation becomes s

ωII

= s

= r

=

2mg(3/4)r (m(1/2 r)2 ) + (mr2 )

(1.176)

(6/4)g (5/4)r

(1.177)

6g 5r

(1.178)

at which point it should be clear that pendulum II has a frequency of 80

p

6/5 that of pendulum I

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

Correct Answer (A)

81

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #62

Recommended Solution Anytime you get an increase in volume, you will be doing work so we should first eliminate (A). By the same type of reasoning, if V1 = V0 then the work should be 0 so we can eliminate (B). Next, because the problem tells us that we can treat the gas as an ideal gas, which should mean that the type of gas is irrelevant, we should be able to ignore specific heats because they are dependent on the type of gas. From this, eliminate (D). Lastly, we need to use the thermodynamic work equation and ideal gas law to see that the solution should have a natural log, Z V1

W =−

P dV

(1.179)

V0

nRT V Combine Equation 1.179 and Equation 1.180, and integrate to get P =

W

= −

 Z V1  nRT

dV V = nRT [ln(V1 ) − ln(V2 )]   V1 = nRT ln V0

(1.180)

(1.181)

V0

so we should choose (E) Correct Answer (E)

82

(1.182) (1.183)

1.63. PGRE9277 #63

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #63

Recommended Solution If you’re clever, you’ll notice that (A) and (B) are exactly opposite so they can’t both be wrong and we know it must be one or the other. In order to choose between the two, recall that a system of maximal probability is in its most stable state so we would expect no spontaneous changes and we choose (D). Correct Answer (D)

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #64

Recommended Solution Immediately eliminate (D) because the presence of Ez = kz guarantees we will have some sort of electric field. Next, eliminate (C) because there is nothing about (Ex , Ey , Ez ) that forces the electric field to vary, especially considering that the only non-zero component is scaled by a constant k and z can be constant as well. Next, eliminate (A) because nothing about what is given demonstrates any time dependence and, for that matter, it says essentially the same thing as (C) which we already decided wasn’t correct. If (B) is also untrue, then we choose (E). However, recall Gauss’ law ~ = ρ ∇·E 0

(1.184)

which clearly states that we should get a charge density in the region of the electric field. Correct Answer (B)

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #65

Recommended Solution We are looking for angular frequency so we should expect to get units of inverse time, recall the SI units for each variable/constant used in the solutions

Q/q = C 0 = C /N · m

(1.186)

m = kg

(1.187)

R = m

(1.188)

check each of the potential solutions (A)

Qq 2π0 mR2

m = sec 2

(B)

Qq 4π0 mR2

m = sec 2

(C)

Qq 2π0 mR3

1 = sec 2

(1.185) 2

85

1.65. PGRE9277 #65 √

Qq 4π0 mR2

m = sec

Qq 2π0 mR3

1 = sec−1 = sec

(D)

q

(E)

q

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

Correct Answer (E)

Alternate Solution If you insist on doing this problem in the rigorous fashion, start with Coulomb’s law 1 qQ 4π0 R2

(1.189)

since there are two charges pushing on the central charge q, we change this to account for both with

F

= =

1 2qQ 4π0 R2 1 qQ 2π0 R2

(1.190) (1.191)

Next, recall that the force for an oscillating spring is m¨ x = −kx

(1.192)

and has angular frequency k m re-arrange Equation 1.192 to get everything in terms of k/m to get ω2 =

ω2 =

k x ¨ =− m x

(1.193)

(1.194)

or equivalently, ω2x = x ¨

(1.195)

Finally, since F = m¨ x, use Equation 1.195 with Equation 1.191 (and let x = R) to solve for angular frequency

m¨ x = mω 2 x = ω2 =

qQ 2π0 R2 qQ 2π0 R2 qQ 2π0 mR3 s

ω =

86

qQ 2π0 mR3

(1.196) (1.197) (1.198) (1.199)

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Correct Answer (E)

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PGRE9277 #66

Recommended Solution Recall from the Work-Energy theorem W = ∆EK

(1.200)

Since energy is conserved, the kinetic energy used to move the chain up will be equal to the total potential energy at the top of the axle. The potential energy can be found by W = EG = mgh = (10 kg)(10 m/s2 )(10 m) = 1000 J

(1.201)

Correct Answer (C)

Alternate Solution You could, if you aren’t as industrious as I, set up a differential to account for the changing mass of the chain as it is lifted up. However, to do this quickly let’s first consider our simple work equation W = F ∆x

(1.202) 2

To make a quick approximation, assume that g = 10 m/s and make measurements for every 1 m of change in the chain which will account for a decrease in 20 N. The initial change of of 1 m with a 10 meter long chain with 2 kg per meter is 200 N · m. The next bit of work will be 180 N · m and then 140 N · m and so on to get

Wnet = 200 + 180 + 160 + 140 + 120 + 100 + 80 + 60 + 40 + 20 = 1060 N · m which is closest to (C). Correct Answer (C)

88

(1.203)

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Alternate Solution If you insist on doing things the hard way, start out with the integral form of work W =−

Z

F · dx

(1.204)

In our problem the force changes as the length changes and it changes proportional to F = mg = (20 kg − 2l)g

(1.205)

that is to say that the mass is initially 20 kg and then decreases by 2 times the length of the chain. Plug Equation 1.204 into Equation 1.205 to get

W

= −

Z 0

(20 kg − 2l)gdl

(1.206)

10

Z 10

=

20g − 2gl dl

(1.207)

0

=

h

20gl − gl2

i10 0

(1.208)

= (2000 N · m) − (1000 N · m)

(1.209)

= 1000 N · m

(1.210)

Correct Answer (C)

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #67

Recommended Solution The intensity of the light that gets transmitted through the polaroid is given as I = A + B cos(2θ)

(1.211)

Which tells us that one term can go to 0 when cos(2θ) goes to 0 while the other term, the A term, can’t. This tells us that the light is composed of two different types of polarizations and we eliminate (A), (B) and (E). Lastly, to distinguish between (C) and (D), recall Malus’ law which states that plane polarized light has intensity proportional to I = I0 cos2 (θ)

(1.212)

which we can re-write in a similar form as Equation 1.211 by the double angle identity 2 cos2 (a) = 1 + cos(2a) which gives us (C). Correct Answer (C)

90

(1.213)

1.68. PGRE9277 #68

1.68

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #68

Recommended Solution To calculate optical resolution, we need to use the Rayleigh Criterion, λ (1.214) d the angle and wavelength are given so we can re-arrange Equation 1.214 to solve for d, sin(θ) = 1.22

d=

1.22λ sin(θ)

(1.215)

By a small angle approximation, which we can make because the angle is in microradians, let sin(θ) = θ and then convert all of the values into the same units to get 1.22λ θ 1.22(5.5 × 10−7 m) = 8.0 × 10−6 m ≈ 1 × 10−1 m

(1.218)

≈ 10 cm

(1.219)

d =

(1.216) (1.217)

which is closest to (C). Correct Answer (C)

Alternate Solution Even without remembering the necessary equation, you eliminate some choices by a bit of common sense. Because we are talking about a telescope reflecting mirror, we can probably eliminate (A) and (B) as being ridiculously small to be a reflecting mirror on a telescope. On the other end of the spectrum, a 100 m reflecting mirror would be ridiculously too big. In fact, the largest telescopes on earth peak at or just sightly above 10 m so 100 m is very unlikely and we can eliminate (E). At this point, you can now guess between (C) and (D). 91

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Correct Answer (C)

92

1.69. PGRE9277 #69

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #69

Recommended Solution A photon travels through a medium with an index of refraction, n, according to the equation c n The index of refraction of the glass is, n = 1.5, so we plug that in and solve v=

v = =

c 3/2 2 c 3

Correct Answer (D)

93

(1.220)

(1.221) (1.222)

1.70. PGRE9277 #70

1.70

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #70

Recommended Solution Start off with the relativistic equation E 2 = p2 c2 + m2 c4

(1.223)

The problem tells us that the energy is E = 100mc2 so we plug that into Equation 1.223, (100mc2 )2 = p2 c2 + m2 c4 2 4

10000m c

2 2

2 4

= p c +m c

(1.224) (1.225)

We could then combine terms with m2 c4 but doing so will make almost no change to the 10000m2 c4 so let’s just ignore it. Finally, solve for the p in Equation 1.225 to get p2 c2 = 10000m2 c4 2

p

2 2

= 10000m c

p = 100mc which is (D). Correct Answer (D)

94

(1.226) (1.227) (1.228)

1.71. PGRE9277 #71

1.71

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #71

Recommended Solution Start off by recalling that as temperature and, therefore, net energy of a system blows up to infinity, energy levels will start to become equally populated. Based on this, get rid of any solution that doesn’t account for a temperature dependence, specifically (A). Also from this fact, we can eliminate any solution that doesn’t give the average number as N0 /2 when T → ∞, which would 95

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be (C). Finally, when the temperature is minimized (i.e. let T = 0), we would expect all N0 of the particles to be at energy level E1 so plug this into the remaining options to find (B)

N0 1+e−k/(0)

(D)

N0 1+ek/(0)

(E)

N0 e/kT 2

= N0

=∞

=∞

So we choose (B). Correct Answer (B)

96

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #72

Recommended Solution Recall that heat capacity is the derivative of energy with respect to temperature, CV =

97

∂U ∂T

(1.229)

1.72. PGRE9277 #72

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

the problem gives us the energy so we take the derivative of it

CV

dU dT   N0  d d = (E1 N0 ) + dT dT 1 + e/kT 2  e/kT  = N0 k kT (1 + e/kT )2

=

(1.230) (1.231) (1.232)

which is (A). The worst part of this problem is doing the quotient rule under pressure but you can recognize certain pieces that should be there and only do part of the derivative to get the right answer. Correct Answer (A)

98

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #73

Recommended Solution We can immediately eliminate (B) because it is generally true that entropy increases as temperature increases. We can also eliminate (D) because entropy should approach 0 as temperature approaches 0, not approach some non-zero value. Eliminate (E) because we have more than enough information to pick a choice. Finally, we need to decide whether or not entropy has an upper limit (i.e. option 99

1.73. PGRE9277 #73

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

(C)) or goes off to infinity (i.e. option (A)). Because there is some temperature at which all energy levels get equally populated, we also have a temperature at which any further increases in temp won’t result in a wider dispersion of the particles so we should choose (C). Correct Answer (C)

100

1.74. PGRE9277 #74

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #74

Recommended Solution We start off with the angular frequency equation, s

ω=

mgR I

(1.233)

The moment of inertia can be found by using the parallel axis theorem I = ICOM + mR2

(1.234)

where ICOM is the moment of inertia of the object about an axis passing through its center of mass. In the case of a loop, that moment of inertia about the center of mass is the same as a point particle at distance R so we get I = ICOM + mR2 2

= mR + mR = 2mR

2

2

(1.235) (1.236) (1.237)

so the moment of inertia for rings X and Y is

IX IY

= 2(4m)(16R2 ) = 2mR

2

(1.238) (1.239)

plugging these into the angular frequency, ω, gives s

ωX

= r

=

(4m)g(4R) 2(4m)(16R2 )

(1.240)

4g 32R

(1.241)

and

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s

ωY

mgR 2mR2 r g = 2R

=

(1.242) (1.243)

comparing the two, we get ωX ωY

p

g/8R g/2R r 1 = 4 1 = 2 =

p

which is (B). Correct Answer (B)

102

(1.244) (1.245) (1.246)

1.75. PGRE9277 #75

1.75

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #75

Recommended Solution By conservation of momentum, we should have the original momentum equal to the sum of the individual momentums of the two atoms,

Pnet = PT + PH 0 = mT vT + mH vH mT vH = − vT mH

(1.247) (1.248) (1.249)

If we combine Equation 1.249 with the kinetic energy equation for helium, we get

KH

= = = =

1 2 m H vH 2 1 m2 mH 2T vT2 2 mH 2 1 mT 2 v 2 mH T   mT 1 mT vT2 mH 2

(1.250) (1.251) (1.252) (1.253)

and since mT > mH , the kinetic energy of the Helium atom must be larger than the kinetic energy of the Thorium atom. Correct Answer (E)

103

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CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #76

Recommended Solution The total angular momentum quantum number, j, is the sum of the spin angular momentum, s, and the orbital angular momentum number, l, j =l+s

(1.254)

Since we have three electrons and all electrons have a spin of 1/2, the total spin angular momentum must be

s = s =

1 1 1 + + 2 2 2 3 2

(1.255) (1.256)

Then, recalling the orbital angular momentum rules (S, P, D, F, . . .) → (0, 1, 2, 3, . . .), we get

l = 0+1+1

(1.257)

l = 2

(1.258)

Sum the values from Equation 1.256 and 1.258 to get

s = 2+ s =

3 2

7 2

Correct Answer (A)

104

(1.259) (1.260)

1.77. PGRE9277 #77

1.77

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #77

Recommended Solution If we keep in mind that the magnetic moment is a measure of the tendency of an object to align itself with a magnetic field. Although the magnetic moment of the nucleus and electrons are both non-zero (which let’s us eliminate (A)), we can determine just from common sense that a very small and light weight particle will more easily change alignment to conform to the magnetic field than will a ”heavy nucleus”. This means that the ratio of magnetic moment between nucleus and electron should be less than 1, which eliminates all but (D) and (E). Between the two, we can comfortably choose (E) because, as I said previously, the mass of the nucleus is what resists the change in alignment. Correct Answer (E)

105

1.78. PGRE9277 #78

1.78

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #78

Recommended Solution Note that at time t = 0, the velocity should be equal to the initial velocity 2v0 that it had right before grabbing the pole. To check this limit, take the derivative of all of the possible solutions at time t = 0 to see which of these correctly predicts the condition. (A) x0 = v = 2v0 (B) x0 = v +



0.5b(3v0 ) b

(C) x0 = 0.5v0 + (D) x0 = v0 +







0.5b(3v0 ) b

0.5b(6v0 ) b

(E) x0 = 0.5v0 +



cos(0) = 2.5v0





cos(0) = 2v0

cos(0) = 4v0

0.5b(6v0 ) b



cos(0) = 3.5v0

Only (A) and (C) meet this criteria and since (A) doesn’t properly account for the rotation with a sine function, choose (C). Correct Answer (C)

106

1.79. PGRE9277 #79

1.79

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #79

Recommended Solution The group velocity is the velocity with which the overall wave travels while the phase velocity is the rate at which the phase propagates. The relevant equations for group velocity and phase velocity are

vg = vp =

∂ω ∂k ω k

(1.261) (1.262)

take the derivative (tangent on the curve) between k1 and k2 to get a roughly constant negative value for the group velocity. The phase velocity, however, has a positive value because it’s a negative slope with an inverse relationship. Since one is positive and the other is negative, they should be in opposite directions and we choose (A). Correct Answer (A)

107

1.80. PGRE9277 #80

1.80

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #80

Recommended Solution Start with the equation for the energy of an electromagnetic wave, E=

hc λ

(1.263)

and now adjust it to solve for the wavelenth hc (1.264) λ we know the energy is 25 kilovolts and can utilize Planck’s constant and the speed of light constant from the front of our test booklet. Plug everything in to get λ=

(4 × 10−15 eV · s)(3.0 × 108 m/s) 2.5 × 104 eV 12 × 10−7 eV · m = 2.5 × 104 eV = 4 × 10−11 m

(1.267)

= 0.4 Angstroms

(1.268)

λ =

which is nearly (B). Correct Answer (B)

108

(1.265) (1.266)

1.81. PGRE9277 #81

1.81

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #81

Recommended Solution In electronics, we will reach the max steady-state amplitude at the point when impedence is matched between ZL = ZC

(1.269)

ZL = jωL

(1.270)

1 jωC

(1.271)

The inductor impedance is

and the capacitor impedance is ZC =

so applying Equations 1.270 and 1.271 to Equation 1.269 gives us

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ZL = ZC 1 jωL = jωC = ω2j 2 1 = LC r 1 ωj = LC which gives the same inverse LC dependence that (C) suggests. Correct Answer (C)

110

(1.272) (1.273) (1.274) (1.275) (1.276)

1.82. PGRE9277 #82

1.82

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #82

Recommended Solution First, recall the angular impulse H is proportional to the moment of inertia by H = Iω

(1.277)

the moment of inertia of a plate through its center is (1/12)mL2 , so with our length of 2d, we get

I = = =

1 mL2 12 1 m(2d)2 12 1 md2 3 111

(1.278) (1.279) (1.280)

1.82. PGRE9277 #82

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

now solve for ω in Equation 1.277 with Equation 1.277 plugged into it to get our final answer

ω = = =

H I H (1/3)md2 3H md2

Correct Answer (D)

112

(1.281) (1.282) (1.283)

1.83. PGRE9277 #83

1.83

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #83

Recommended Solution We can get the right proportionality to figure out the solution by making a few small angle approximations. Start by summing the forces in both dimensions FA = −FT −x FT −y = −FG

(1.284) (1.285)

by geometry, we can figure the length of d as d/2 L d = 2L sin(θ)

sin(θ) =

(1.286) (1.287)

we can also use some trigonometry to a relationship between tensions sin(θ) = 113

FT −x FT

(1.288)

1.83. PGRE9277 #83

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

plug Equation 1.288 into Equation 1.287 to get d = 2L

FT −x FT

(1.289)

Finally, get a relationship between FT −y and FT and apply the small angle approximation cos(θ) ≈ 1 to get FT −y FT FT −y 1 = FT FT = FT −y

cos(θ) =

(1.290) (1.291) (1.292)

but since FT −y = −FG = −mg and FT −x is the force from Coulomb’s law, substitute these values into Equation 1.289, FT −x FT 2Lkq 2 d2 mg

d = 2L = which matches (A).

Correct Answer (A)

114

(1.293) (1.294)

1.84. PGRE9277 #84

1.84

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #84

Recommended Solution For choices (A) and (B), we can see that these are both true by the Larmor formula P =

e2 a2 6π0 c3

(1.295)

Next, we know that (C) must be true by the LinardWiechert potential which states, in a big hot mess, ~ x, t) = q E(~

~n − β~ γ 2 (1 − β~ · ~n)3 R2

!





~ × ~β] ˙ q  ~n × [(~n − β)  + ~˙ c 3 (1 − β · ~n) R

(1.296)

~ ∝ 1/R2 . Finally, we know that (E) is true because as we go off to of which, we only car that E infinity, both fields tend to 0. We are left with (D) so that must be our correct answer. Correct Answer (D)

115

1.85. PGRE9277 #85

1.85

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #85

Recommended Solution Start of with the relativistic energy equation E = γm0 c2

(1.297) 2

the energy is given to us as E = 1.5 MeV and the mass is me = 0.5 MeV/c , 1.5 MeV = γ(0.5 MeV/c2 )c2 γ = 3

(1.298) (1.299)

now, we want to use the relativistic momentum equation but to do so, we need the velocity of the electron. Using our result from Equation 1.299, solve for v, γ = 3 =

1 q

v2 c2

q

v2 c2

1− 1 1−

v2 9 1− 2 c

(1.300) (1.301)

!

= 1

v2 c2

=

8 9√

(1.302) (1.303)

8 c (1.304) 3 Plug results from Equation 1.299 and 1.304 into the relativistic momentum equation to get the final answer v =

P

= γm0 v

(1.305)

√ = 3(0.5 MeV/c )( 8/3 c √ = (0.5) 8 MeV/c

(1.306)

= 1.4 MeV/c

(1.308)

2

116

(1.307)

1.85. PGRE9277 #85

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

Correct Answer (C)

117

1.86. PGRE9277 #86

1.86

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #86

Recommended Solution First, eliminate any option that includes V0 (i.e. (A) and (C)) as the oscilloscope provides this data and therefore wouldn’t be dependent on any of the other pieces of data being known. Next, recall that a capacitor discharges according to V = V0 e−t/RC

(1.309)

which tells us that we will need R and we can eliminate (C) and (E). Additionally, we will need the time which we can derive from the sweep rate, s, so we get our final solution as (B). Correct Answer (B)

118

1.87. PGRE9277 #87

1.87

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #87

Recommended Solution To find the net energy, we need to sum the kinetic energy and potential energy of the particle H =T +V

(1.310)

since the orbit is circular, we know that the centripetal force must be equivalent to the attractive force

Fc = FK mv 2 K = r r3

(1.311) (1.312)

In Equation 1.312, if we just multiply a 1/2 to the LHS and cancel out the r, this becomes our kinetic energy equaiton 1 K mv 2 = 2 2 2r

(1.313)

Now for the potential energy, we use

V

= −

Z

119

F · dr

(1.314)

1.87. PGRE9277 #87

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

= − =

Z

K dr r3

K 2r2

(1.315) (1.316)

but because the potential is attractive, it becomes negative. We then sum the 2 potentials from Equation 1.313 and 1.316 to get

H = T +V K K = − 2 2 2r 2r = 0 which is (C). Correct Answer (C)

120

(1.317) (1.318) (1.319)

1.88. PGRE9277 #88

1.88

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #88

Recommended Solution According to the problem, this parallel plate capacitor is connected to a batter. As long as it is not removed, the voltage and electric field should not be altered, even if a dielectric is put in place. This tells us that (A), (B) and (D) must all be wrong. Next, we can find the before and after charge as

Q0 = C0 V0

(1.320)

Qf

(1.321)

= κC0 V0

so (C) must be wrong. This only leaves (E). Correct Answer (E)

121

1.89. PGRE9277 #89

1.89

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #89

Recommended Solution Recall the solution to the Infinite square well, which gives us a set of sinusoidal waves (Figure 1.5) The first plot given represents n = 0, the second is n = 1, the third is n = 2 and so on. It should become clear that all even values for n peak at x = 0 and so these will be disrupted by the infinite potential at this point. The odd valued quantum numbers won’t so they will remain. This description only matches (E). Correct Answer (E)

Figure 1.5: Plots of the solution to the infinite square well 122

1.90. PGRE9277 #90

1.90

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #90

Recommended Solution It’s worth memorizing the scale of energy spacing for the different energy levels E = Etrans + Erot + Evib + Eelec

(1.322)

Erot ≈ 0.001 eV

(1.323)

Evib ≈ 0.1 eV

(1.324)

Eelec ≈ 1 eV

(1.325)

those being

from which we see that the rotational energy level should be around 10−3 which is (B). Correct Answer (B)

123

1.91. PGRE9277 #91

1.91

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #91

Recommended Solution Eliminate (A) because the pion isn’t a lepton. Next, eliminate (B) because the Λ particle is a baryon so it must have spin 1/2. We can also quickly eliminate (D) because angular momentum is conserved. Lastly, eliminate (C) because it isn’t true that all interactions that don’t produce a neutrino are weak. Correct Answer (E)

124

1.92. PGRE9277 #92

1.92

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #92

Recommended Solution For a single coil of wire, it is relatively clear that a rotating magnet with frequency of 10 Hz will give us an alternating voltage of 10 Hz. However, for three coils, for every third of a rotation 10 Hz will have been generated for a single coil and a full rotation will have done 3 of these, making the net frequency 40 Hz Correct Answer (D)

125

1.93. PGRE9277 #93

1.93

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #93

Recommended Solution When the weight is released at time t = 0 and angle θ = 0, the weight is essentially in free fall so it should have an acceleration of a = g. Plug in the θ = 0 condition to check the limit (A) g sin(0) = 0 (B) 2g cos(0) = 2g (C) 2g sin(0) = 0 p

(D) g 3 cos2 (0) + 1 = 2g q

(E) g 3 sin2 (0) + 1 = g and only (E) meets our criteria. Correct Answer (E)

126

1.94. PGRE9277 #94

1.94

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #94

Recommended Solution The Lorentz transformation always takes the form of t0 = γ (t − vx)

(1.326)

x

0

= γ (x − vt)

(1.327)

y

0

= y

(1.328)

z

0

= z

(1.329)

which tells us that whatever the coefficients we have on x0 and t0 , they should be the same with the variables swapped. This is only true of (C) so this must be our solution. Correct Answer (C)

127

1.95. PGRE9277 #95

1.95

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #95

Recommended Solution Assuming that ETS hasn’t given us a bunch of useless information in this problem, which is probably a pretty good assumption, we can arrive at the answer quickly with a bit of dimensional analysis. We are given, and should try to use, 1012 proton/sec

(1.330)

2

(1.331)

20

10

nuclei/cm

2

10 proton/sec −4

10

steradians

(1.332) (1.333)

The only way to arrange these 4 values to get a final unit of cm2 /steradian is by

(1020

(102 protons/sec) = 10−26 cm2 /steradian 12 −4 nuclei/cm )(10 proton/sec)(10 steradians) 2

Correct Answer (C)

128

(1.334)

1.96. PGRE9277 #96

1.96

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #96

Recommended Solution If you recognize that this setup is precisely the setup used to measure the index of refraction of air and you recall that the index of refraction of air is 1.000293, then you can quickly see that (C) is the correct answer. Correct Answer (C)

Alternate Solution In a gas interferometer, a beam of light is passed to a partially silvered mirror which splits the beam into two parts. One part continues through the mirror and the other is reflected at a right angle. Ultimately, both beams arrive at the observer and create an interference pattern. We know that the optical path length is related to the index of refraction by nL, but since the light travels the distance L twice, we re-write it as 2nL. Now, if we remove the gas from the system, our index of refraction must change (∆n) and the interference pattern will its fringes shift according to ∆n =

mλ 2L

129

(1.335)

1.96. PGRE9277 #96

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

Since the index of refraction of most gases is nearly 1, we typically define the index of refraction of any gas as the index of refraction of a vacuum (i.e. n = 1) plus some additional factor kp, where k is some constant and p is the air pressure. ngas = 1 + kp

(1.336)

changes in index of refraction are proportional to changes in air pressure by ∆p = ∆nk

(1.337)

so we combine Equations 1.335, 1.336 and 1.337 to get n=1+

mλp 2Lδp

(1.338)

to make a quick approximation, and because this information is given, lose the dependence on p (i.e. p = ∆p) and solve to get mλ 2L (40 fringes)(500 nm) = 1+ 2(5 cm) = 1 + 0.0002

(1.341)

= 1.0002

(1.342)

n = 1+

which is (C). Correct Answer (C)

130

(1.339) (1.340)

1.97. PGRE9277 #97

1.97

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #97

Recommended Solution To start off, check the units of each potential solution to see that only (A) and (D) give some sort of mass 

(A) m∗ = 12 h ¯ 2k (B) m∗ =

dk dE



= kg

4 6 = mseckg 4 )

¯2k h

(

dk dE

(C) m∗ = h ¯ 2k (D) m∗ = 



h2 ¯ d2 E dk2

d2 k dE 2

1/3

= A big mess that clearly has extra units

 = kg

(E) m∗ = 12 h ¯ 2 m2



d2 E dk2



5 8 = kgsecm 4

At which point you can either make an educated guess or recall that you should be differentiating the energy with respect to wave number, as in (D), rather than differentiating wave number with respect to energy, like in (A). Correct Answer (D)

131

1.98. PGRE9277 #98

1.98

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #98

Recommended Solution Recall that we find the eigenvalues from a matrix by finding the determinant of the characteristic equation 



0−λ 1 0   0−λ 1  det  0 1 0 0−λ You can, and for speed you should, use the quick method of finding the determinant of a 3 dimensional matrix (which I once heard called the “shoe string method”) 



−λ 1 0 −λ 1   0 −λ 1 0 −λ   1 0 −λ 1 0 multiplying the diagonals and summing them (via “shoe string method”), you get (−λ3 + 1 + 0) − (0 + 0 + 0) = 0 3

(1.343)

−λ + 1 = 0

(1.344)

3

(1.345)

λ

= 1

Then from complex analysis, since we clearly only have 1 real solution (i.e. λ = 1) the rest of the solutions must be complex and, therefore, (B) must be a false statement. Correct Answer (B)

132

1.99. PGRE9277 #99

1.99

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #99

Recommended Solution For this problem, you should be able to immediately recognize that the correct answer is (A). This is because the Hydrogen atom, unlike nearly every other problem in all of quantum mechanics, is an ideal and exactly solvable system. For this reason, there is no correction factor for the hydrogen atom in its ground state. Correct Answer (A)

133

1.100. PGRE9277 #100

1.100

CHAPTER 1. PHYSICS GRE SOLUTIONS

PGRE9277 #100

Recommended Solution In order to figure out the balancing point of the system, we need to find its net center of mass. m1 x1 + m2 x2 mtotal

(1.346)

We know the masses of each block are m1 = 20 kg and m2 = 40 kg and the positions are x1 = −5 m and x2 = 5 m, with respect to the center. We also know the total mass is the sum of the 2 blocks and the mass of the rod (i.e. 20 kg + 40 kg + 20 kg = 80 kg) so we can plug everything in and solve to get (20 kg)(−5 m) + (40 kg)(4 m) 80 kg 100 = m 80 = 1.25 m

COM =

which is (C). Correct Answer (C)

134

(1.347) (1.348) (1.349)

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